Key Takeaways:

  1. YouTubers, the Slow Mo Guys, recently captured astounding footage of light moving at its maximum speed of 300,000 kilometers per second.
  2. The team achieved this feat using specialized equipment found at CalTech, a camera capable of an extraordinary 10 trillion frames per second – 20 million times faster than their previous best.
  3. Postdoctoral scholar Peng Wang from the Compressed Ultrafast Photography department assisted the team in capturing light’s movement within 2,000 picoseconds.
  4. The camera exclusively detects light itself, with the background (a bottle in this case) added later. This groundbreaking technique enables the visualization of light in motion.
  5. The result is a spectacular video that showcases light traveling the length of a bottle at an unprecedented speed of 10 trillion frames per second.

In a recent breakthrough, the Slow Mo Guys, renowned YouTubers for their captivating slow-motion footage, ventured into the realm of capturing light at its incredible speed of 300,000 kilometers per second. Having explored various slow-motion scenarios for over a decade, the team aimed to tackle the challenge of recording “the fastest thing we as the human race know of.”

To embark on this ambitious project, the Slow Mo Guys sought the assistance of cutting-edge equipment at CalTech. Their typical high-speed cameras, capable of recording up to half a million frames per second, were eclipsed by CalTech’s exceptional camera, boasting an astonishing 10 trillion frames per second – a staggering 20 million times faster than their previous best.

In a video documenting the experiment, the host expressed the magnitude of the achievement: “Their camera puts ours to shame and does 10 trillion frames per second. For reference, that is 20 million times faster than the fastest we’ve ever filmed on this channel.” The team collaborated with postdoctoral scholar Peng Wang from the Compressed Ultrafast Photography department, who assured them that this technology would enable the visualization of the speed of light.

The extraordinary frame rate allowed the team to witness light’s movement within an astonishingly brief timeframe of 2,000 picoseconds. Wang explained that the camera exclusively detected the light itself, with the background (in this case, a bottle) added afterward. Despite this post-processing, the outcome was nothing short of spectacular – a mesmerizing video capturing light in motion at an unprecedented 10 trillion frames per second.

This groundbreaking achievement represents a significant leap in our ability to comprehend and visualize the fastest entity known to humanity. The Slow Mo Guys have not only expanded the boundaries of slow-motion cinematography but also provided a captivating glimpse into the timeless speed of light. The collaboration with CalTech’s advanced technology marks a milestone in the pursuit of pushing the limits of what we can capture and understand through the lens of high-speed cameras.

0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments